Tag Archives: Tacoma Artists Initiative Program

Apply Now! Funding for Tacoma Artists

27 Nov

The City of Tacoma is now accepting Tacoma Artists Initiative Program (TAIP) funding applications from eligible Tacoma artists who wish to create new artwork in any discipline and present that work through a free public component. Applications must be submitted online by 11:59 p.m. on Jan. 21, 2019.

“TAIP funding assists innovative, creative artists in their efforts to realize exhibitions, performances, and workshops that are free to the public. Tacoma’s artists are cultural and economic driving forces in our communities, and we are pleased to partner with them in their efforts.” – Mike Sweney, Tacoma Arts Commission Chair

The Tacoma Arts Commission has allocated up to $65,000 for TAIP funding, and each selected artist will be awarded $2,500. Funding for TAIP is determined through a competitive application process. A panel comprised of Tacoma Arts Commission members, community members and past TAIP awardees will review applications and make funding recommendations. Those recommendations will go to the Tacoma Arts Commission for approval. All projects selected for TAIP funding must be completed by Dec. 31, 2020.

Eligibility extends to artists who are residents of Tacoma, practicing artists who are dedicated to producing artwork on a regular basis, are at least 18 years of age, and not a full-time undergraduate or graduate student in an arts-related degree program. Artists who have received TAIP funding between 2015 and 2018 are not eligible to apply.

Please see the TAIP guidelines and application instructions for full details.

Applicants are encouraged to attend a free workshop which explains and addresses questions about the application and funding process on Dec. 13, 2018, from 5:30-7 p.m., at the Tacoma Municipal Building, 747 Market Street, Room 243.

Advertisements

It Takes A Village

7 May

Village Online poster 2Village Online misc 1

It Takes a Village is a photographic meditation and found object installation centering on a particular Value Village store once located on Hosmer Street in South Tacoma. Filmmaker, photographer, editor, and collage artist Isaac Olsen worked there in 2011 and 2012. During that time, he took pictures of the mayhem behind the friendly non-profit façade, wrote letters to management urging for the lowering of book prices, and collected over 4,500 discarded personal photographs and works of art, donated knowingly and unknowingly by the citizens of the City of Destiny. 

It Takes A Village showcases the best of these forgotten memories, ranging from the highest to the lowest of our culture. The exhibit mingles these pieces, with a display of Olsen’s original photographs, in a number of fashions for your viewing pleasure.

Village Online misc 5For a $5 cover charge, see the show on Saturday, May 16 and enjoy light snacks, special guests, and a ‘junk installation’ to fully round out the experience. Or swing by on Sunday, May 17 for a free viewing.

What: It Takes A Village: A found photography and art exhibition
Where:
 717 Tacoma Ave South, Suite C
When:
 May 16 & May 17, 2 – 9 pm
Cost:
$5 cover charge on May 16, Free on May 17

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support this project through Tacoma Artists Initiative Program funding. Exhibit space generously provided by Spaceworks Tacoma.

Village Online poster 1

Funding Available for Tacoma Artists

2 Dec
Carla Barragan, 2013-14 TAIP funding recipient, choreographed Raven and the One who Sits on the Tides.

2013-14 TAIP funding recipient Carla Barragan choreographed Raven and the One who Sits on the Tides.

The City of Tacoma is now accepting 2015-16 Tacoma Artists Initiative Program (TAIP) funding applications from eligible Tacoma artists who wish to create new artwork and present that work through a free public component. The application deadline is 5 p.m. on January 26, 2015.

2013-14 TAIP funding recipient Sarah Gilbert's "Boy with Watermelon". Photo by Jeff Curtis.

2013-14 TAIP funding recipient Sarah Gilbert’s “Boy with Watermelon”. Photo by Jeff Curtis.

“TAIP is a remarkable program and I am proud that the City offers artists the opportunity to develop innovative work for public benefit,” said Tacoma Arts Commission Chair Traci Kelly. “From traditional art exhibits, music and dance performances, to free ‘how to’ workshops, Tacoma continues to benefit from the creative energy participants contribute to our community.”

The Tacoma Arts Commission has allocated $40,000 for TAIP funding, and each selected artist will be awarded $2,500. Funding for TAIP is determined through a competitive application process. A panel comprised of Tacoma Arts Commission members, community members and past TAIP awardees will review applications and make funding recommendations. Those recommendations will go to the Tacoma Arts Commission for approval. All projects selected for TAIP funding must be completed by December 31, 2016.

Eligibility extends to artists who are residents of Tacoma, practicing artists who are dedicated to producing artwork on a regular basis, are at least 18 years of age, and not a full-time undergraduate or graduate student in an arts-related degree program. Artists who have received TAIP funding between 2011 and 2014 are not eligible to apply.

Please see the TAIP guidelines and application form for full details.

Applicants are encouraged to attend a free workshop which explains and addresses questions about the application and funding process on December 16, 2014, from 5:30-7 p.m., in the Tacoma Municipal Building, 747 Market St., 9th floor, Visibility Center Conference Room.

‘Made in Tacoma’ free concert January 11

6 Jan

steighner hi-resWhat: Free concert and CD Release for ‘Made in Tacoma, New Chamber Music for Saxophone’
Where: Museum of Glass, 1801 Dock Street, Tacoma
When: January 11, 1 PM
Admission: Free

Tacoma’s Alea Publishing & Recording announces the January 11, 2014 release of a new CD recording, ‘Made in Tacoma: New Chamber Music for Saxophone,’ featuring local saxophonist Erik Steighner.

A free concert open to the public will take place at the Museum of Glass at 1pm on Saturday, January 11. The program will feature Steighner along with fellow saxophonists Evan Smith and Fred Winkler, and will include both works from the CD (by Greg Youtz, Jeff Tecca, and Erik Steighner) as well as other pieces from the saxophone repertoire (by Paul Hindemith, Barry Cockcroft, and Allan Blank).

CD GraphicThe CD will be available for purchase at the January 11 concert and after that time from the Alea Publishing & Recording website, www.bassclarinet.org, as well as a variety of other online retailers. This recording, made with the support of the Tacoma Arts Commission’s Tacoma Artists Initiative Program, features all–‐Tacoma production, composers and performers:

Recorded August 1 and 5–‐7, 2013 in Lagerquist Concert Hall, Pacific Lutheran University
Producer: Edwin Powell; Sound Engineer: Patrick Colin Wakefield
Performers: Erik Steighner: Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Baritone Saxophones; Karen Ganz: Piano; Zachary Lyman: Trumpet; Francine Peterson: Bassoon; Evan Smith: Alto Saxophone; Miho Takekawa: Percussion; Fred Winkler: Soprano Saxophone; Brian Yarkosky: Percussion.
Composers: Gregory Youtz, Deborah Anderson, Robert Hutchinson, Jeff Tecca, Clement Reid, Erik Steighner.

Tacoma photos: Kim Davenport, Alea Publishing & Recording
Design/layout: Laurie Davenport, Alea Publishing & Recording

Assemblage Theater presents Pericles Snowdon’s haunting Bluebeard

17 May
Cherilynn Williams & Annie Katica Green in rehearsal for Bluebeard.

Cherilynn Williams & Annie Katica Green in rehearsal for Bluebeard.

What: Pericles Snowdon’s Bluebeard
Where: Chapel at Urban Grace, 902 Market Street, Tacoma
When: Fridays & Saturdays, May 31 – June 15, 8 p.m.
Tickets: $14/adults; $7/students w/ID. Tickets available at the door or in advance at Brown Paper Tickets.
Information: www.assemblagetheater.com

Raised inside an abandoned church since they were babies, four women have been taught to fear the outside world. Locked in to keep them safe from an ice storm which, 25 years ago, brought the world-as they-knew-it to an apocalyptic end, the four exist in a makeshift society controlled by their tortured matriarch, Blue. This uniquely written tour de force highlights one of London’s finest young playwrights. In its west coast premiere, English playwright Pericles Snowdon’s Bluebeard explores parenthood, political subjugation, gender, the environment, betrayal, and the apocalypse. The play, while dark and creepy, is charming and engaging with a fetching touch of dark humor. Bluebeard, presented by Tacoma’s Assemblage Theater, opens Friday, May 31 and runs for three weeks. Two pay-what-you-can performances are scheduled for Thursday, June 6 and 13.

Featured in the cast are Kathi Aleman, Nicole Lockett, Heather Christopher, Kaylie Rainer, Annie Katica Green and Cherilyn Williams.  Bluebeard is directed and produced by David Domkoski, with original music by Stanley William. Production design is by Erin Chanfrau.

“We all know the fairy tale about Bluebeard, who keeps his wives hostage, insisting that they be obedient to his will. It’s clearly a tale of patriarchal rule,” said David Domkoski, the play’s director. “How do we react to the tale, however,” asked Domkoski, “when the controller is a mother bent on protecting her daughters? That’s the premise which Pericles explores in his play. As the girls’ mother asks, ‘Isn’t it better to be put away somewhere safe than to get sent out to a world without a heart.'” Post-play discussions with the cast and director are scheduled after every performance.

Bluebeard was first produced in London, enjoying a sell-out run at the Old Red Lion Theater and garnering Time Out Critic’s Choice. It then transferred to New York and the Toronto Festival where it won rave reviews and the coveted Patron’s Pick award.

Assemblage Theater’s production of Bluebeard is funded in part through the Tacoma Artists Initiative Program of the Tacoma Arts Commission. Additional funding came from a recently completed campaign on KickStarter.com

About the playwright

In 2009 Pericles was selected by a panel of Radio 4 producers and artistic directors to receive the £10k OffWestEnd Adopt A Playwright award. The winning play, They Who Lay in Fields Like Beasts, was then introduced by Ian McKellen at The Theatre Royal Haymarket. Last year his memory palace play The Cat’s Mother was produced by all-female theatre company FoxedUp at The Courtyard in London, receiving 5 stars and a grant from the Arts Council.

Big ideas? Apply now for 2013 TAIP funding

2 Jan
Bronze sculpture by Kyle Dillehay.

Bronze sculpture by Kyle Dillehay.

Do you have an idea you’re ready to launch? The City of Tacoma is accepting applications for funding from the Tacoma Artists Initiative Program (TAIP) through 5 pm on Feb. 11, 2013, from eligible Tacoma artists who wish to create new artwork and present that work through a free public component.

“In the past, funded artists have helped Tacoma residents connect to a rich array of public exhibits, readings, film screenings, workshops, performances and more,” said Tacoma Arts Administrator Amy McBride. “We’re excited to see what the new year brings.”

The Tacoma Arts Commission has allocated $40,000 for TAIP funding, and each selected artist will be awarded $2,500. A panel comprised of Tacoma Arts Commission members, community members and past TAIP awardees will review applications and make funding recommendations. Those recommendations will go to the Tacoma Arts Commission for approval. All projects selected for TAIP funding must be completed by Dec. 31, 2014.

Eligibility extends to artists who are residents of Tacoma, practicing artists who are dedicated to producing artwork on a regular basis, are at least 18 years of age, and not a full-time undergraduate or graduate student in an arts-related degree program. Artists who have received TAIP funding between 2009 and 2012 are not eligible to apply.

More details, including information on other eligibility requirements and the application form, are available at tacomaculture.org/arts/funding.asp. Application forms are also available by calling (253) 591-5191 or emailing nstrom-avila@cityoftacoma.org.

Applicants are encouraged to attend a free workshop which explains and addresses questions about the application and funding process on Jan. 9, 2013, from 5:30-7 p.m., in the Tacoma Municipal Building (747 Market St., 9th floor, Visibility Center Conference Room). Naomi Strom-Avila, Community and Economic Development, nstrom-avila@cityoftacoma.org, (253) 591-5191.

Lolo – free documentary screening this Saturday!

27 Dec

lolo

What: Lolo, a documentary film by Ronald J. Lagman
Where: Evergreen State College – Tacoma campus. 1210 Sixth Avenue, Rm. 218
When: Saturday, December 29 at 1 pm
Cost: Free

This Saturday, at the Tacoma campus of Evergreen State College, filmmaker Ronald J. Lagman will screen his short documentary film, Lolo, about the heroic and forgotten Filipino-American soldiers who fought World War II in the Pacific. This event is free and open to the public.

Lagman immigrated to the US from the Philippines in 1997, at age 27. “When I was in film school at Seattle Central Community College’s film and video program, in 2003, I stumbled upon a news article about WWII Filipino-American soldiers who had served under General Douglas MacArthur in the Pacific when the Philippines was a commonwealth, much like Guam and Puerto Rico.”

He discovered that after fighting in the war, “the US government took away the soldiers’ military benefits. I was shocked and deeply bothered.” Lagman was disturbed not only because this chapter of American history wasn’t widely known, but because he had “enlisted in the US Air Force and [was] just waiting to graduate to leave for basic training. I thought to myself, ‘If they can do this to them, what’s stopping the government from doing this to me someday – cut my military benefits when I’m close to retirement…

“I don’t recall having immediate family members that fought in the war; however, my great-grandmother (when she was still living) shared with me personal family stories of the short Japanese occupation of Manila.”

Lagman started stitching together the stories of five Filipino veterans in 2003-2004. He filmed his 22-minute narrative documentary entirely at the International Drop-In Center in Seattle, a non-profit center that assists the elderly. He also located historical footage through the National Archives. The Tacoma filmmaker hopes to distribute Lolo “to WWII Filipino-American groups in the US so that they can use it for educational purposes….

“Many years from now, the Afghanistan and Iraq wars will be forgotten,” he warns, and the men and women who fought it may be lost to history also. “We as a nation, as a people, should not let this grave injustice happen to our heroes.”

This project was funded in part by the Tacoma Arts Commission’s  Tacoma Artists Initiative Program.

The Bridle Show

24 Dec

IMG_5811What: Artist Talk by Lisa Kinoshita
Where: Fulcrum Gallery, 1308 South, MLK Street  Tacoma, WA 98405
When: Friday, December 28, 2012 at 5 pm
Cost: Free

Lisa Kinoshita’s Bridle Show explores the vanishing art of horsehair hitching, a traditional Western art whose most skilled practitioners are amongst the inmates at Montana State Prison (MSP). Kinoshita traveled to the prison to interview inmates who are making horsehair art, and she took up the parallel art of leather braiding and knotting, a time-honored practice of vaqueros, American Indians and cowboys, to collaborate on a single horse’s bridle which demonstrates the beauty of a functional art form revered in centuries past.

Since the 1800s, inmates at MSP have kept this incredibly intricate and increasingly rare art alive inside prison walls, passing on their knowledge from hand to hand (mostly) under supervised conditions. Hitching exists at other prisons, in Washington (Walla Walla), Wyoming, Colorado, and Arizona, but none surpasses the quality of work coming out of Deer Lodge, MT. Observers say this practice has been shown to help reduce tension in the prison environment and build inmates’ self-confidence, while also contributing to victims’ restitution. Inmates are allowed to sell their finished pieces, such as horsehair bridles, for up to thousands of dollars in the prison gift shop. In the process, they are keeping alive a skill that few modern artisans have the time or patience to master.

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to help fund this project through the Tacoma Artists Initiative Program.

IMG_5843

Hitched horsehair reins by MSP inmate. Unlike braiding, hitching consists of thousands of miniscule half-hitch knots, tied 5-10 hairs at a time.

%d bloggers like this: