Tag Archives: Oliver Doriss

2015 Tacoma Studio Tour Preview: Part 8

7 Oct

This is part 8 in our series highlighting the artists participating in the Tacoma Studio Tour this October.

What: Tacoma Studio Tour
Where: 35 studio locations around Tacoma
When: October 17 & 18, 11 am – 5 pm
Cost: FREE!

This year’s tour features 57 artists and collaborative studios and allows the general public the opportunity to see the spaces in and tools with which local artists create their work, ask questions, and purchase one-of-a-kind creations. All studios will feature demonstrations of the artistic process or will have hands-on activities for visitors. Check out TacomaArtsMonth.com for the full list of artists, schedule, your Tacoma Studio Tour Passport, and an interactive map where you can plot your own custom tour course.

Here are this week’s highlights:

Naarah McDonald, Revisioned – an urban boutique
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Naarah McDonald has worked as a costumer and designer for over 20 years. While the majority of her time has been in theatre, she branched out over 5 years ago to work with reclaimed materials to produce new designs that celebrate artful living. Her studio is located in the urban boutique she opened in 2014.

Oliver Doriss, Oliver Doriss Designs
07-Tacomamoment Visual Altitude 03_SkyPonds 07_Blue_Moon
Oliver Doriss uses glass as his primary medium. It is informative, seductive, unforgiving and possesses an archival quality similar to that of quartz or obsidian. This enduring aspect gives background to his own mortality. He finds himself in an environment that consists of artificial human construction and raw unstoppable nature. Both forces consume and alter the permanence of our world, in a way that is barely perceptible at times. He is intrigued by this juxtaposition.

John McCuistion
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John McCuistion creates artwork about history, myth, storytelling, religion, relationships, ceremony, civilization, and humor. The themes in his current work deal with air, land, water, and the magical natural world around us. He is interested in the language of gesture, expression, texture, form, and color. Through his work, John contributes to the long tradition of the artist as teacher, recorder, and seer.

Jennifer Chin
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Jennifer Chin was born in Seattle and completed her BA in Art at the University of Washington. Her paintings and collage start with a basic concept and evolve through prototyping and experimentation into fully realized series. This year her inspiration has been Japanese textile surface design techniques (shibori), batik, repeat patterns, and Rorschach ink blots. Her paintings and prints are included in private collections in Arizona, California, Idaho, Texas, and Washington.

Deborah Greenwood
Exhibition Entry 2015 Monoprint Spiral dried grasses Journal Greenwood-1-a
Deborah Greenwood, papermaker and book artist, loves working with used materials. When the overall mood of an object impacts her, she is moved to fuse it into art. Whether it is by turning garden plants into paper or cutting and reassembling ephemera, new forms appear. The most striking thing about the majority of the materials she uses is their ordinariness. She says, “I am endlessly fascinated by the transformation that takes place in the process and the relationships that take shape.”

 


Tacoma Studio Tour Passport – Visit and Win!

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New this year! Make sure to have your Studio Tour Passport stamped at each studio location you visit. Once you’ve collected at least 8 stamps, send us the page and you’ll be entered into a drawing for a chance to win one of several fabulous prize packages containing artwork hand-crafted by a selection of artists on this tour including:

The Tacoma Studio Tour Passport can be found in the Tacoma Studio Tour brochure (available at all studio locations during the tour and at many cultural institutions ahead of time) or download and print your own Tacoma Studio Tour Passport.


Check out these other artists on the tour and watch for future previews:
Studio Tour Preview: Part 1
Studio Tour Preview: Part 2
Studio Tour Preview: Part 3
Studio Tour Preview: Part 4
Studio Tour Preview: Part 5
Studio Tour Preview: Part 6
Studio Tour Preview: Part 7

Tacoma Arts Month is sponsored by Click! Cable TV, The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation, Northwest Public Radio, KPLU, Weekly Volcano, Tacoma Weekly, South Sound magazine, and ARCADE.

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2014 Tacoma Studio Tour Preview: Part 7

24 Sep

This is part 7 in our series highlighting the artists participating in the Tacoma Studio Tour this October.

This year’s tour features 61 artists and collaborative studios and allows the general public the opportunity to see the spaces in and tools with which local artists create their work, ask questions, and purchase one-of-a-kind creations. All studios will feature demonstrations of the artistic process or will have hands-on activities for visitors. Check out TacomaArtsMonth.com for the full list of artists, schedule, and an interactive map where you can plot your own custom tour course.

What: Tacoma Studio Tour
Where: 37 studio locations around Tacoma – map your course at TacomaArtsMonth.com
When: October 11 & 12, 11 am – 5 pm
Cost: FREE!

Here are this week’s highlights:

Yoshiko Yamamoto, The Arts & Crafts Press
Kindness of Ravens  Poppies in Bloom  Colvos Scan 300 dpi medium
Yoshiko Yamamoto’s love of traditional block printing began early in Japan, where she grew up. Her limited-edition block prints and letterpress-printed note cards are based on her study of the ukiyoe prints and the turn-of-the-20th-century Arts & Crafts movement. Although the process for multi-colored block printing is laborious, it’s also extremely rewarding. Yoshiko enjoys depicting the nature around her, from the grandeur of Mt. Rainier, to the fragility of a spider web, spun tirelessly on a tree branch.

Anne Elrod, Anne Elrod Studio
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Anne Elrod has been creating art for the last 20 years. Her work is in private collections in Washington, California, Hawaii, Alabama, and Norway. Her passion is color, texture, and what if? One of her axioms is painted on her studio wall: “I’ve never met a color I didn’t like”, along with Winston Churchill’s wise quote: “never, never, never give up” and Goethe’s: “begin!” Anne believes that creativity is in everything and everyone.

Nancy McLaughlin
In the Meadow  Sea Foam Dancers  Snow Front
Nancy McLaughlin works from sketches made on site and from memory, emphasizing interpretation over realism. She is inspired and influenced by many artists, including Arthur Dove and Emily Carr. Beginning with a pared-down arrangement of contrasting shapes, she allows the process of color-mixing and brushwork to dictate the final outcome. The finished works are colorful expressions of the essential forms which inspire her.

Joan Teed
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Joan Teed shares studio space with the well-known artist, William Turner, in a century old brick warehouse. She specializes in oils, acrylics, and pastels, and paints from photographs of her travels throughout the countries of the Mediterranean, in a representational/contemporary style. She is also a gifted portrait artist and accepts commissions. Vivid color and texture are the cornerstones of her style.

Carolyn Burt, Creative Expressions by Carolyn Burt
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Carolyn Burt uses the precise and exacting medium of scratchboard to produce intricate detail, vivid contrast, and wonderful textures resulting in dramatic and almost 3-dimensional effects. Reminiscent of the intricate hand carvings of scrimshaw, each piece is carefully engraved. The process begins with an archival museum quality board covered with white China clay and black India ink, which is scratched away to expose the white. Color can then be added, if desired.

Oliver Doriss, Oliver Doriss Design
Image_1_Doriss  GlassSkull  Image_4_Doriss
Oliver Doriss uses glass as his primary medium. It is informative, seductive, unforgiving and possesses an archival quality similar to that of quartz or obsidian. This enduring aspect gives background to his own mortality. He finds himself in an environment that consists of artificial human construction and raw unstoppable nature. Both forces consume and alter the permanence of our world, in a way that is barely perceptible at times. He is intrigued by this juxtaposition.

Marquita Hunt
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Marquita Hunt is currently producing non-objective or abstract work in acrylics or oils on canvas. Painting with Bill Turner, Sharon Carr, and Joan Teed is a conduit for her creative freedom. There is a sense of community in this shared purpose and she is able to access creativity that wouldn’t otherwise flourish. This collective group energy is a luxury she can’t do without. Marquita’s paintings are  accomplished one clue, one urge, one intuition at a time.

 

Check out these other artists on the tour and watch for future previews:

Studio Tour Preview: Part 6
Studio Tour Preview: Part 5
Studio Tour Preview: Part 4
Studio Tour Preview: Part 3
Studio Tour Preview: Part 2
Studio Tour Preview: Part 1 

Tacoma Arts Month is sponsored by Click! Cable TV, The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation, Northwest Public Radio, KPLU, Weekly Volcano, Tacoma Weekly, Premier Media Group, and Exit133.

2012 “Foundation of Art Award” Winner: Oliver Doriss

10 Jun

Award-winning glass artist and gallerist, Oliver Doriss. Photo courtesy of GTCF

The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation is pleased to announce glass artist Oliver Doriss as the winner of its fifth annual “Foundation of Art Award”. Founded in 2008, the Foundation of Art Award is one of the most prestigious regional art awards, designed to recognize the talent and commitment of local artists to the Pierce County community. As the recipient, Doriss will receive a $7,500 award and create a commissioned art piece for the Community Foundation, to be unveiled in December 2012 at a five-year culminating art show featuring the work of Foundation of Art Award nominees from the past five years.

“Palimpsest” by Oliver Doriss. Photo courtesy of GTCF

An artist from a young age, Doriss transitioned from ceramics to working in glass at the age of 16, and has been an active member of the contemporary glass movement for over two decades. His artwork ranges from cast glass sculptural forms to public art installation. In 2007, Doriss founded the Fulcrum Gallery, a contemporary art venue in Tacoma’s Hilltop neighborhood, which he owns and operates.

“Oliver is deeply committed to art in Tacoma, both as an artist and a gallerist,” said Jeremy Mangan, former Foundation of Art Award winner and the Foundation of Art Committee member who nominated Doriss for the Award. “His own glass work is as unique and risky as it is beautiful, and Fulcrum Gallery is a vital and dynamic venue where art and community meet in the best way.”

“Domed City” by Oliver Doriss. Photo courtesy of GTCF

Doriss was one of 16 talented Pierce County artists nominated for the award by a committee of local art professionals. Other nominees included R.R. Anderson, Gabriel Brown, Kyle Dillehay, Spencer Ebbinga, Travis Galindo, Susan Russell Hall, Matt Johnson, Chris Jordan, Maria Jost, Chuck Knigge, Meghan Mitchell, Peter Serko, Kenji Stoll, Sharon Styer and Judy Wagner.

“I was flattered just to be nominated,” said Doriss. “I couldn’t have done a better job at identifying the creative community than in the artists that were nominated. To be selected as the winner and have that recognition is very validating.”

An online gallery is available at http://www.gtcf.org showcasing images of each nominee’s artwork, as well as interviews with the artists.

The previous four Foundation of Art winners include Chris Sharp in 2008, Jeremy Mangan in 2009 Lisa Kinoshita in 2010 and Jessica Spring in 2011.

Congratulations, Oliver!

Walking the Walk on the Prairie Line Trail

13 Nov

On Saturday, glowering skies drenched the opening of Temporal Terminus: Marking the Line, an exhibit of temporary art installations sited along the Prairie Line Trail. The deluge did not scare off the large crowd who turned out for a guided tour of the art works starting at Tollefson Plaza, winding down to the Tacoma Art Museum and Thea Foss Waterway, continuing along the esplanade by the Museum of Glass, and back up to the University of Washington-Tacoma. Rain or no rain, it was a great opportunity to see how this half-mile, $5.83 million legacy trail – the western terminus of the Transcontinental Railroad, completed during Abraham Lincoln’s presidency – will link up Tacoma’s major cultural attractions.

The rain started on Friday as the eight teams of artists commissioned to create art for the pedestrian/bike trail project now underway began installing their works. It became an all-out battle of humans vs. nature as the weekend progressed. By the time the tour began on Saturday, well-wishers had girded themselves with umbrellas, raingear and high spirits to view the temporary installations along the trail. Here’s a glimpse of the eight new public art works on view through Nov. 26:

UW-T Campus
Title: Ghost Prairie
Artists: Thoughtbarn  (Lucy Begg & Robert Gay)

Thoughtbarn’s installation speaks to the railroad line’s namesake. Inspired by the mysterious Mima mounds in Thurston County, and the plight of the diminishing prairie, this installation introduces a piece of ‘artificial prairie’ along the rails running through the UW-T campus. It is a playful referral to both the railroad’s history and its new landscape-driven future as a bike and pedestrian path through the city. For its duration the colorful, intriguing object will catch the eye of local pedestrians and drivers. Those most curious can get up close to run their hands along the ‘grasses’, which also glow at night.


UW-T Pedestrian Bridge

Title: Envision
Artists: Jeremy Gregory, Diane Hansen, Ed Kroupa

Gigantic eyes look down on the campus from the pedestrian bridge. Are they benevolent? Visionary? Judging? That depends. The eyes are those of Abraham Lincoln, the visionary whose dream it was to complete a transcontinental rail that would meet the Pacific. Is he overlooking his accomplishment or wondering about this particular route’s demise and our crazy modern lives? Walking over the ped bridge, one experiences a different viewpoint and inspiration for the endurance of vision.


Grassy area by UW-T
Title: Manifest Destiny
Artists: Maria Meneses, Nicholas Nyland, Elise Richman

Manifest Destiny was a phrase that justified the territorial expansion of the United States as if it were a divine sanction. A series of markers reminiscent of the Northern Pacific Railroad signs act as a historical timeline of Tacoma, starting in 1870, three years before Tacoma was designated as the western terminus for the transcontinental railroad. A stepping stone begins the journey and the subsequent signs track the growing population of the city over 140 years at intervals that represent the largest jumps in population.

Dock Street Grassy Area
Title: Zero Down
Artists: Chris Jordan, Chandler O’Leary, Claudia Riedener

From a series of ‘footprints’ that occupy the grassy area, colorful shadows extend.  The images are rendered in temporary paint and continued in chalk, the forms span the grass and onto the concrete morphing into forms human and imagined.  Each brightly colored shadow represents the diversity and complexities of humans’ personalities. Seen here, a ghostly profile that will fade over time.

15th Street Overpass
Title: TACOMABALL
Artists: Kyle Dillehay, Lisa Kinoshita, Oliver Doriss

The curve of this overpass is the inspiration for TACOMABALL, a monumental, temporarily interactive pinball-style game which will come to life during the Prairie Line Trail tour. Gigantic red balls will be bowled down the curve interacting with various obstacles depicting both notorious and beloved local icons. Racing stripes and imagery reminiscent of the game will remain on the ramp (assuming nature cooperates) through the course of the exhibit making every pedestrian a player in the game.

Hood Street
Title: Rogue Rhizomes
Artists: Chris Sharp, Lance Kagey, James Sinding

This section of the Prairie Line Trail is a ragged remnant of an industrial heritage that has witnessed dynamic transformation all around, while remaining itself, virtually unchanged over the last 100 years. The fringes of this space are a competition between structured plantings and wildness trying to reinsert itself into the landscape. This installation explores the rogue elements of organic invasiveness, between city and wildness. Using brightly colored markers and a three-dimensional letterform the eye is drawn from a distance and evoke ideas of giant flora. Organic patterns around the base of each light pole emanate outwards over time making use of positive and negative space and ‘invade’ the surrounding area.

Photo: Holly Senn

Tollefson Plaza
Title: Link
Artists: Bret Lyon, Janet Marcavage, Holly Senn

Link makes visible the connection between the rail lines and highlights how the Prairie Line Trail linked Tacoma to the communities of Tenino, McIntosh, Wetico, Rainier, Yelm, Roy, Hillhurst, Lakeview, and South Tacoma. Floating yellow orbs, iconic of the yellow and black railroad signs will re-enact the stops along the line that connected with these communities.


Photo: Kristin Giordano

Under I-705
Title: Wild Wilderness
Artists:  Jennifer Adams, Kristin Giordano, Kenji Stoll

This work comments on the diminishing open spaces in our world and the impact on animal habitat.  In addition, it calls attention to the wild spaces that exist within our urban midst. Peeking from the interesting, dense vegetation near Tacoma Art Museum, a variety of animals that would be hard pressed to co-exist inhabit this newly created environment. Think: mega fauna.

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