Tag Archives: Museum of Glass

Now streaming – 8th episode of Tacoma’s ‘artTown’

18 Jul

Hot Shop Heroes participant Rukiya Leake in the Museum of Glass hot shop.

The City of Tacoma’s Media and Communications Office – in partnership with the Office of Arts & Cultural Vitality – has released a new episode of artTown, a cultural documentary-style TV initiative exploring Tacoma’s emergence as a major creative hub in the Pacific Northwest.

Tattoo artist Jorge Mota

In this episode:

  • Learn how the Hot Shop Heroes program at the Museum of Glass, a partnership with the Warrior Transition Battalion at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, helps wounded veterans transition back into civilian life
  • Explore the history and artistry behind Fiery Jade: Cai Yan, a full-length opera production about a Chinese woman poet born in 177 AD at the war-ridden end of the Eastern Han Dynasty, with music composed by Gregory Youtz and libretto by Zhang Er
  • Jackie Fender and Joshua Swainston introduce you to Creative Colloquy, an organization that fosters the literary arts community through a literary website, an annual print review, monthly readings, and other events
  • Explore tattoo artistry in Tacoma with Jorge Mota, Catalina and Josh Felkins, and Justin Winter
  • Learn how fitness inspires creative movement as flamenco dancer Marisela Fleites-Lear discusses her relationship with the University Y Student Center
  • Visit Owen Beach with playwright Nick Stokes to learn how this park gives space for creative development

Marisela Fleites-Lear practices flamenco at the University Y Student Center

Launched in 2013, the series has earned numerous awards and features diverse perspectives on a variety of creative disciplines. Offering a more holistic look at creativity in Tacoma, artTown stretches beyond what people might traditionally think of as “creative” – such as fine art, music or dance – to spotlight other creative areas of interest that have flourished in Tacoma like fashion, innovative education practices, architecture and more.

Online viewing:
Watch “artTown” anytime at cityoftacoma.org/artTown

YouTube:
Watch segments or the full episode anytime on the City of Tacoma’s YouTube Channel

TV Tacoma air times:
Mondays at noon
Tuesdays at 1 a.m.
Wednesdays at 8 a.m.
Thursdays at 6 p.m.
Fridays at 8 p.m.
Saturdays at 5 p.m.
Sundays at 5 a.m.

TV Tacoma is aired on both the Click! and Comcast Cable systems. On Click!, TV Tacoma can be seen on Channel 12 within Tacoma City limits and in Pierce County, with the exception of University Place, where TV Tacoma can be found on Channel 21. On Comcast, TV Tacoma can be seen on Channel 12 within Tacoma city limits and on Channel 21 in Pierce County. TV Tacoma is not on the Comcast system in University Place, but is accessible anywhere on the Internet at tvtacoma.com.

Music and Mount Rainier’s Melting Glaciers

12 May

More than a concert:  Symphony Tacoma’s  Mountain and Sea gives artistic voice to Mount Rainier’s melting glaciers

Date: Saturday, May 13
Time: 7:30pm
Location: Pantages Theater, Tacoma
Tickets: stat at $19. Visit www.tacomasymphony.org  or call 253-591-5894

The World Premiere of a new symphonic work.  A multimedia experience featuring video, glass art and music.  A symposium exploring changes to the delicate ecosystem of the Mountain and its glaciers.  A collaboration between the Arts and the National Park Service.  A once-in-a-lifetime educational opportunity for area high school students.  Symphony Tacoma’s Mountain and Sea season finale is all this and more.

Conceived by Music Director Sarah Ioannides, Mountain and Sea is a collaborative effort between Symphony Tacoma, Museum of Glass, Hilltop Artists and Mount Rainier National Park to create a cross-disciplinary multimedia artistic event culminating with the Symphony’s season finale. Commemorating the Centennial of the National Parks System, the project will engage area residents in music and glass art and raise awareness of the plight of Mount Rainier’s glaciers, which are melting at an alarming rate.

The capstone of the project is the multimedia world premiere of Fire-Mountain, a new symphonic work by Daniel Ott, commissioned by Symphony Tacoma.  A musical portrait of natural wonders, Ott’s Fire-Mountain utilizes 155 musicians, including the 85-piece Symphony Tacoma and 70-person Symphony Tacoma Voices. The work will be accompanied by an art film produced by Derek Klein, multimedia director at the Museum of Glass.  Projected above the stage during the premiere, the film will feature images of the mountain combined with footage shot at a recent glassblowing event in the hot shop, during which Hilltop Artist students created glass art using fire and ice in response to improvisatory music by Symphony Tacoma musicians.

Also on the program will be Grieg’s Suite No. 1 from Peer Gynt, featuring “In the Hall of the Mountain King,” and Debussy’s impressionist masterpiece, La Mer.  The concert, sponsored by Boeing and underwritten by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, will take place at 7:30pm Saturday, May 13 at the Pantages Theater in Tacoma.  For tickets, visit tacomasymphony.org or call 253-591-5894.

Silent Sentinel

For the residents of Pierce County, Mount Rainier is a silent sentinel, always present on the horizon and guarding life in the South Sound area. In 2015, scientists released a sobering report warning of the rapid recession of the mountain’s glaciers—the largest on a single peak anywhere in the contiguous United States—and the ecological consequences that will soon follow.  The geography of the region, with its mountains and valleys intertwined with the many-fingered Salish Sea, is unique in the world.  Here, mountain and inland sea interact in ways not seen elsewhere.

Mountaintop Experience

On Wednesday, May 10, Sarah Ioannides will join the string orchestra students from Lincoln High School during a daylong field trip to Paradise on Mount Rainier. Symphony Tacoma has a special relationship with the Lincoln High students; string players from the Orchestra spend eight weeks during the school year embedded there as coaches and mentors.  On this day, the students will trade their instruments for snow shoes as they explore Paradise, hear presentations about the extensive glacial system, and learn from Ioannides and Ott about the creative process and how an artist responds to external events to create art.  Later in the week, the students will be guests of honor at the dress rehearsal, along with National Park Service officials.  Lincoln High School has the highest rate of poverty of any school in Pierce County.  Its thriving orchestra program, under the direction of Symphony Tacoma violinist Cynthia Iverson, is an important creative outlet and lifeline for students.

Not just a concert—an event

Prior to the concert, subscribers and donors will be invited to a fascinating Music Mixer panel discussion, held in Studio 3 at the Pantages, featuring Ioannides, Daniel Ott, climatologist Mike Warner, and Mount Rainier National Park Deputy Superintendent Tracy Swartout. The lobby will include informational displays staffed by NPS officials.  Hilltop Artist students will also be on hand with displays of their glass art from the March 16 Fire and Ice event.  The panelists will also participate in a post-concert question-and-answer session in the lobby, open to all.

“Art responds to life, and by building relationships in the community, art can serve as a catalyst for education, growth and transformation in a region,” stated Sarah Ioannides.  “Through a process of community collaboration and working in multiple mediums, this partnership seeks to produce an inspiring experience, empowering participants to undertake an active role in protecting our region.”

 

Music and Art in Concert

26 Apr

From left to right: One of five paintings depicting the George Washington Bush party traveling to Oregon; painting by Jacob Lawrence. Image courtesy of Washington State Historical Society. Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance); painting by Amy Sherald. Frances and Burton Reifler © Amy Sherald. Treasure-trove by Kelly O’Dell and Raven Skyriver. Courtesy of the artist; photo by Kp Studios.

 

The ability for art and music to move its audience is powerful.  The combination of these two mediums in one setting will be an unprecedented collaboration that is not to be missed at Northwest Repertory Singer’s Celebrating the Arts in Tacoma.

What: Celebrating the Arts in Tacoma concert
Where: Mason United Methodist Church, 2710 N. Madison St., Tacoma
When: Saturday, May 6 at 7:30 pm and Sunday, May 7 at 3 pm. Pre-concert lectures start one hour prior to each performance.
Tickets: $15 – $18. Purchase tickets for May 6 here or for May 7 here.

Celebrating the Arts in Tacoma will be a unique musical experience. Presented in three segments, multimedia visual presentations will surround the choir.  Each section of music relates to an exhibit at three major Tacoma museums:

The Outwin 2016: American Portraiture Today

Through May 14, Tacoma Art Museum features a traveling exhibit of contemporary portraiture representing 43 artists from 20 states, including both emerging and internationally known artists.  As the choir sings about the gripping plea for peace of “I Dream a World” by André Thomas or shares the supportive camaraderie of Paul Simon’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” the strong human spirit and the stories behind these words will be strengthened by the triumphant images of art facing the audience.

Coming to Washington: George Washington Bush

This inspiring exhibit at the Washington State History Museum follows the first immigration path to the state of Washington.  This segment will focus on the importance of art and music within the hearts of the brave pioneers and the rich cultures which inhabit the state we call home. Coupled with Mack Wilberg’s “Wayfarin’ Stranger” and Marta Keen’sHomeward Bound,” these soul-stirring images portray travels through a world of woe to the bright land of promise. 

Into the Deep

Water and sea creatures beckon in this Museum of Glass exhibit.  Fifty-five pieces by nationally and internationally known artists exquisitely express the beauty of marine life in the ocean.  As the mother seal sweetly sings to her pup in Eric Whitacre’s “Seal Lullaby” and Gwyneth Walker takes the audience on a mesmerizing journey through a triad of movements in “Three Days by the Sea,” the breathtaking images from this exhibit will deepen your appreciation and awe for the similar and beautiful parallels of marine water and glass. 

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support Northwest Repertory Singers and this concert through our Arts Projects funding program.

2017-18 Arts Anchor Fund and TAIP Recipients Announced

22 Mar

Hilltop Artists Team Production student, Dawntae, marvering hot glass. Photo courtesy of Hilltop Artists

10 Arts Organizations and 18 Artists Funded by Tacoma Arts Commission

The Tacoma Arts Commission has awarded $255,000 to 10 Tacoma-based arts organizations through its Arts Anchor Fund program, and $45,000 to 18 Tacoma artists through its Tacoma Artists Initiative Program. The Arts Anchor Fund program awards range in value from $20,000 to $33,000 each, and the Tacoma Artists Initiative Program awards are $2,500 each. Funding for both programs is for the 2017-2018 biennium.

“Tacoma’s arts community is thriving,” said Tacoma Arts Commission Chair Mike Sweney. “With these grants, we are honored to support our major arts institutions and independent artists in engaging, enlightening, and inspiring their communities as well as audiences from the Puget Sound and beyond.”

Arts Anchor Fund Program Awards

From Tacoma Opera’s production of The Magic Flute. Photo courtesy of Tacoma Opera.

The 2017-2018 Arts Anchor Fund program award recipients are: The Grand Cinema, Hilltop Artists, Museum of Glass, Northwest Sinfonietta, Symphony Tacoma, Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma Little Theatre, Tacoma Musical Playhouse, Tacoma Opera, and Tacoma Youth Symphony Association.

In 2016, nine of these organizations served 506,909 people, provided free admission to 130,181 people, and generated an estimated $9.67 million for the local economy.

The Tacoma Arts Commission established the Arts Anchor Fund program in 1995 to provide financial support to major local not-for-profit arts organizations that significantly improve the quality of life for Tacoma. These arts organizations serve Tacoma’s community through regularly scheduled performances, exhibits and events, and school and outreach programs.

Tacoma Artists Initiative Program Awards

The Red Chador: Threshold
public performance-installation by Anida Yoeu Ali. Photo courtesy of Anida Yoeu Ali.

The 2017-2018 Tacoma Artists Initiative Program funded artists are: Anida Yoeu Ali, Travis Barker, Priscilla Dobler, Daniel Garcia, Antonio Gomez, Mark Hoppmann, Maria Jost, Anne Lyman, Kevin Miller, Elise Richman, Mauricio Robalino, Jessica Spring, Nicholas Stokes, Kenji Stoll, Masahiro Sugano, Qin Tan, Collin Veenstra, and Ben Wildenhaus

Funded Tacoma Artists Initiative Program projects include: production and screening of a live action short film; production of two music albums paired with public performances and a workshop; writing a book-length poetry manuscript with an accompanying reading; writing and staged reading of a one-act play; music performances on a portable stage; an exploration of the intersection of music and culture, including a bilingual workshop; a multi-media performance of early music; three multimedia temporary public art installations; and the creation and exhibition of visual art including a series of handmade books, illustrations, paintings, mixed-media pieces, letterpress art, and poster art.

From DUELS, by Nick Stokes, directed by José Amador. Pictured: Daniel Christensen and Carter Rodriquez. Photo by Andrea Sassenrath.

The Tacoma Artists Initiative Program was established in 1999 to assist artists with the generation of new work, and to share their talent with the public in a free and accessible format.

The Arts Anchor Fund program and Tacoma Artists Initiative Program are two of three funding programs administered by the Tacoma Arts Commission. For a complete listing of funding programs and information about the Tacoma Arts Commission, visit cityoftacoma.org/arts.

Chihuly Drawings, beautifully presented, well worth seeing

5 May
From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

I recently visited the Museum of Glass to take in the Chihuly Drawings exhibition.  The beautifully curated show impressed me beyond expectation. I have some familiarity with Dale Chihuly’s drawings, due to past experience photographing some of them for the American Heart Association, who he has donated to. I know the nuances of his painting, from trying to capture their vibrance and reflectivity at the same time. But to see the collections now on exhibition at the Museum of Glass is breathtaking. I especially enjoyed the collection of pieces near the back gallery.

Chihuly Drawings continues through June 30, 2015. I suggest you plan to take some time exploring this exhibit, it’s worth pondering. And, while you are there, if you haven’t seen the Patra Passage exhibition, that should be on your list as well. You will be more than happy you did.

 

From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

COMING UP

What: Chihuly’s Venetians: The George R. Stroemple Collection
Where: Museum of Glass, 1801 Dock Street
When: July 19, 2015 – January 4, 2016
More information: www.museumofglass.org, (866) 468-7386

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support the Museum of Glass through the Arts Anchor Fund.

____________________________________________________________

Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyThis review was written by Tacoma Arts Commission Vice Chair Dane Meyer. Dane has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009 in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

2015-16 Arts Anchor Fund and TAIP Recipients Announced

18 Mar

Nine Arts Organizations and 16 Artists Funded by Tacoma Arts Commission

RJ Oki and Trent Quoicho blowing at the Museum of Glass as part of a collaboration with Team Chihuly.

RJ Oki and Trent Quoicho blowing at the Museum of Glass as part of a collaboration with Team Chihuly. Photo provided by Hilltop Artists.

The Tacoma Arts Commission has awarded $255,000 to nine Tacoma-based arts organizations through its Arts Anchor Fund program, and $40,000 to 16 Tacoma artists through its Tacoma Artists Initiative Program. The Arts Anchor Fund program awards range in value from $20,000 to $40,000 each, and the Tacoma Artists Initiative Program awards are $2,500 each. Funding for both programs is for the 2015-16 biennium.

“Supporting a diverse group of local artists and arts organizations helps build a creative community,” said Tacoma Arts Commission Chair Traci Kelly. “Funding the arts at multiple levels means our city gives everyone opportunities for meaningful engagement and expression.”

Arts Anchor Fund Program Awards

Students from Tacoma Art Museum's after school off-site outreach programs visit the museum to tour the galleries. Photo provided by Tacoma Art Museum.

Students from Tacoma Art Museum’s after school off-site outreach programs visit the museum to tour the galleries. Photo provided by Tacoma Art Museum.

The 2015-2016 Arts Anchor Fund program award recipients are: Hilltop Artists, Museum of Glass, Northwest Sinfonietta, Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma Musical Playhouse, Tacoma Opera, Tacoma Symphony Orchestra, Tacoma Youth Symphony Association and The Grand Cinema.

In 2014, these nine organizations served 500,654 people, provided free admission to 124,209 people, and generated an estimated $9.55 million for the local economy.

Flame-working demonstration as part of Museum of Glass' Hot Shop Heroes: Healing with Fire program. Photo by Greg Owen.

Flame-working demonstration as part of Museum of Glass’ Hot Shop Heroes: Healing with Fire program. Photo by Greg Owen.

The Tacoma Arts Commission established the Arts Anchor Fund program in 1995 to provide financial support to major local not-for-profit arts organizations that significantly improve the quality of life for Tacoma. These arts organizations serve Tacoma’s community through regularly scheduled performances, exhibits and events, and school and outreach programs.

Tacoma Artists Initiative Program Awards

Acrylic painting by Christopher Jordan for COLORED Series. Photo provided by Christopher Jordan.

Author, Acrylic painting by Christopher Jordan for COLORED Series. Photo provided by Christopher Jordan.

The 2015-2016 Tacoma Artists Initiative Program funded artists are: Saign Charlestein, Jennifer Chushcoff, Matthew Coté, Kristin Giordano, Michael Haeflinger, Whitney Henry-Lester, Christopher Jordan, Jeremy Mangan, Janet Marcavage, Tim Norris, Chandler O’Leary, Isaac Olsen, Nichole Rathburn, Holly Senn, Emilie Shimkus and Gregory Youtz.

Catabomb, textile sculpture by Nichole Rathburn. Photo provided by Nichole Rathburn.

Catabomb, textile sculpture by Nichole Rathburn. Photo provided by Nichole Rathburn.

Funded Tacoma Artists Initiative Program projects include a spoken word album and poetry reading; a podcast series exploring varying perspectives on Tacoma; production of a series of short films showcasing poetry; performance and recording of instrumental and vocal songs; production of a book of poetry and photographs; and the creation and exhibition of two- and three-dimensional visual art including metal art, photography, mixed media, paintings, printmaking, illustrations, and textile and paper sculptures.

The Tacoma Artists Initiative Program was established in 1999 to assist artists with the generation of new work, and to share their talent with the public in a free and accessible format.

Fall Haul, sketchbook drawing by Chandler O'Leary. Photo provided by Chandler O'Leary.

Fall Haul, sketchbook drawing by Chandler O’Leary. Photo provided by Chandler O’Leary.

The Arts Anchor Fund program and Tacoma Artists Initiative Program are two of three funding programs administered by the Tacoma Arts Commission. For a complete listing of funding programs and information about the Tacoma Arts Commission, visit cityoftacoma.org/arts.

Home

21 May
Sarah Gilbert in the Museum of Glass hot shop. Photo provided by artist.

Sarah Gilbert in the Museum of Glass hot shop. Photo provided by artist.

What do Rochester, NY and Tacoma, WA have in common? Sarah Gilbert has called both places home, and wants to show local citizens what she finds fascinatingly similar about these two gritty cities. It started out as an interest in historical figures that the cities have in common, but grew into a much more personal project. She is interviewing friends and family about their idea of ‘home’ to help develop her new series.

Gilbert is a glassblower and engraver, using her glass as a canvas to illustrate narratives about family in Rochester and friends from Tacoma. Her new series uses a process similar to creating cameos, where the surface is carved away to show contrasting colors below. What makes her work remarkable is not just the practical challenge of using this technique large scale, but also the narrative element. This series includes landscapes or ‘postcards’ from both cities, and portraits of over a dozen friends and family members.

Come and check out some remarkable new glass work, and at the same time get a glimpse into the personal word of a bi-coastal artist.

What: 3000 Miles from Home – an exhibit of cameo engraved blown glass pieces that explore the concept of ‘home’ using  historic and contemporary people and places from Rochester, NY, where Gilbert was born and raised, and Tacoma, WA, where she currently lives.
Where: Kittredge Gallery, University of Puget Sound, N. 15th & N. Lawrence Street.
When: Exhibit will open around August 22, 2014
Cost: Free
Meet Sarah:

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support Sarah Gilbert’s work through the Tacoma Artists Initiative Program.

____________________________________________________________

Tacoma Arts Commission member Traci Kelly. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

Traci Kelly moved to Tacoma in 2004 and joined the Tacoma Arts Commission shortly after. Her degree is in sculpture, but she appreciates the range of arts the City of Destiny has to offer.

‘Made in Tacoma’ free concert January 11

6 Jan

steighner hi-resWhat: Free concert and CD Release for ‘Made in Tacoma, New Chamber Music for Saxophone’
Where: Museum of Glass, 1801 Dock Street, Tacoma
When: January 11, 1 PM
Admission: Free

Tacoma’s Alea Publishing & Recording announces the January 11, 2014 release of a new CD recording, ‘Made in Tacoma: New Chamber Music for Saxophone,’ featuring local saxophonist Erik Steighner.

A free concert open to the public will take place at the Museum of Glass at 1pm on Saturday, January 11. The program will feature Steighner along with fellow saxophonists Evan Smith and Fred Winkler, and will include both works from the CD (by Greg Youtz, Jeff Tecca, and Erik Steighner) as well as other pieces from the saxophone repertoire (by Paul Hindemith, Barry Cockcroft, and Allan Blank).

CD GraphicThe CD will be available for purchase at the January 11 concert and after that time from the Alea Publishing & Recording website, www.bassclarinet.org, as well as a variety of other online retailers. This recording, made with the support of the Tacoma Arts Commission’s Tacoma Artists Initiative Program, features all–‐Tacoma production, composers and performers:

Recorded August 1 and 5–‐7, 2013 in Lagerquist Concert Hall, Pacific Lutheran University
Producer: Edwin Powell; Sound Engineer: Patrick Colin Wakefield
Performers: Erik Steighner: Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Baritone Saxophones; Karen Ganz: Piano; Zachary Lyman: Trumpet; Francine Peterson: Bassoon; Evan Smith: Alto Saxophone; Miho Takekawa: Percussion; Fred Winkler: Soprano Saxophone; Brian Yarkosky: Percussion.
Composers: Gregory Youtz, Deborah Anderson, Robert Hutchinson, Jeff Tecca, Clement Reid, Erik Steighner.

Tacoma photos: Kim Davenport, Alea Publishing & Recording
Design/layout: Laurie Davenport, Alea Publishing & Recording

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