Tag Archives: Dane Meyer

2017 Tacoma Studio Tour Preview: Part 1

9 Aug

Katie Dean demonstrates how to use a printing press during the Tacoma Studio Tour.

We’re excited for Tacoma Arts Month this October and we think you will be as well when you see what is in store! The entire month of October will be filled to the brim with hundreds of arts and culture activities for you to participate in including music, dance and theater performances; visual art exhibits; literary readings; lectures; workshops; film screenings and cultural events.

One of the signature events is the Tacoma Studio Tour, a once-a-year opportunity when you are invited inside the working studios of local artists to learn about the artistic process, ask questions, and purchase one-of-a-kind creations. Plus, you can even win some fabulous items hand-crafted by a selection of artists on the tour just for getting your Studio Tour Passport stamped at each studio address you visit. All studios will feature demonstrations or will have hands-on activities for visitors. It’s family friendly and free!

What: Tacoma Studio Tour
Where: 42 studio locations around Tacoma
When: October 14 & 15, 11 am – 5 pm
Cost: FREE!

Check out TacomaArtsMonth.com for the full list of artists, schedule, your Tacoma Studio Tour Passport, and an interactive map where you can plot your own custom tour course.

Stay tuned as we’ll be bringing you a series of weekly posts featuring sneak peek samples of art from each of the participating artists. Here are this week’s highlights:

Lucy Nilan, Lucy Nilan Ceramics
  
Lucy Nilan creates functional porcelain pottery with whimsical animal illustrations that beg to be used on a regular basis.

Dane Meyer, Dane Gregory Meyer Photography/DG STUDIO
  
There is the opinion that serious artists confine themselves to a business model related to exhibitions, name recognition, and a track through galleries. Dane Gregory Meyer is a serious artist who has contributed his art and subsequent revenue to the City of Tacoma and globally with 30 years as a commercial and fine art photographer. He is often published, seen by many, not dependent on name recognition.

Joe Becker, Seldom Seen Photography
  
Joe Becker is a photographer who specializes in art and travel photography. His work has been published by National Geographic and Northwest Travel Magazine. He recently wrote and illustrated a photographic guidebook of Seattle.

Nancy McLaughlin
  
Nancy McLaughlin’s paintings are celebrations of the naturally occurring forms she photographs and sketches, from the coast of Washington to the high desert mountains of Nevada and Arizona. Beginning with an arrangement of contrasting shapes, she combines expressive color with energetic brushwork and mark-making to bring her unique abstracts and landscapes to life.

Benjamin Davis
  
Benjamin Davis is a longtime Tacoma area resident who draws inspiration from the town and its people. The local vibe is important to his artworks, and his media include oil paints, sidewalk chalk, pen and ink, and Instagram. Being an active member of the 253 Collective is important to Ben as he envisions it as a portal between artist and community.

Elayne Vogel
  
Unusual materials have almost always guided the imagery in Elayne Vogel’s artwork, so “mixed media” usually describes her medium. In recent years she has fabricated one-of-a-kind necklaces, which she calls “Unusual Adornments.” These necklaces are meant to combine humor and fashion in entirely wearable jewelry.

Henry Haneda
  

Henry Haneda has received international awards and invitations for his art and craft works. He uses metal, composite, and wood, which convey detailed craftsmanship to the highest quality products. He has been a world-renowned rod and knife maker since 1980.


Tacoma Studio Tour Passport – Visit and Win!

Make sure to have your Studio Tour Passport stamped at each studio address you visit. Once you’ve collected at least 8 stamps, send us the passport and you’ll be entered into a drawing for a chance to win one of several fabulous prize packages containing artwork hand-crafted by a selection of artists on this tour including:

Grace Amundsen – Acrylic ornaments 
Terry Bader – Small watercolor painting 
Joe Becker – Set of notecards 
Carolyn Burt – Small scratchboard artwork 
Bill Colby – Small framed woodcut 
Kris Crews – Mini photo cards 
Ann Darling – Textile piece 
Katie Dean – Collection of greeting cards and a small print 
Alice Di Certo – Pair of earrings 
Kyle Dillehay – Alternative-process photograph 
Michaela Eaves – Greeting cards 
Lynne Farren – Painting, cards, bracelet 
Becky Frehse – Small framed painting 
Deborah Greenwood – Handmade cards 
Henry Haneda – Small color print 
Hilltop Artists – Glass beads, glass marbles, small blown glass pieces 
Han-Yin Hsu – 3D printed nylon earrings 
Mark Hudak – Pottery bowl 
Marie Jensen – An 8 x 10 print 
Fumiko Kimura – Greeting cards 
Juan La Torre – Thank you cards 
Roberta Lowes – Cards or small scarf 
Dorothy McCuistion – Small handmade book 
John McCuistion – Set of 4 coaster tiles 
Naarah McDonald – Upcycled fingerless sweater gloves, small tote bag, reversible apron 
Dane Meyer – Small matted print 
Roxann Murray – Save the Bees sticker 
Chandler O’Leary – Tacoma temporary tattoos & Tacoma coloring cards 
Sylvia Omero-Rogstad – Set of cards 
Reid Ozaki – Vase 
Karen Perrine – Set of marbled paper collage cards 
Liz Pulos – Small tapestry 
Claudia Riedener – 5 small handmade tiles
Mauricio Robalino – Small wall hanging mosaic
Penny Russell – Set of 4 Blooming Wine Glasses
Jessica Spring – Small book or print
Susan Thompson – Mug
Lorraine Toler – Signed print
Helen Tran – Washington shaped soap bar and greeting card
Audrey Tulimiero Welch – Small painting on paper
William Turner – Set of 5 art cards
Karen Utter – Handmade book
Elayne Vogel – Pair of earrings
Jeff Libby & Adrienne Wicks – Pair of reclaimed wood and steel book ends
Snow Winters – Small cross stitch lamp
Yoshiko Yamamoto – 2018 calendar
Lois Yoshida – Box of hand painted cards

One entry per person. The Tacoma Studio Tour Passport can be found in the Tacoma Studio Tour brochure (available at all studio locations during the tour and at many cultural institutions ahead of time) or download and print your own Tacoma Studio Tour Passport.


Tacoma Arts Month Sponsors

Premier Sponsors: Click! Cable TV, The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation
Media Sponsors: KNKX, Northwest Public Radio, ParentMap, Sounds Fun Mom, South Sound magazine, Tacoma Weekly, Weekly Volcano

Manitou Trestle: dedicated to the love of community

3 Feb

On January 31, about 50 community members gathered in South Tacoma to dedicate the new multi-media mural, Manitou Trestle, created by artists Claudia Riedener, Chris Jordan, and Kenji Stoll, for the South 66th Street Trestle. The public art piece is a project of Sound Transit’s public art program (STart) in collaboration with the City of Tacoma’s Public Art: In Depth artist training program. 

The mural layers South Tacoma’s history, industry and personal experiences with botanical representations of native flora, topography and quotes from the community. These layers of ceramic tile and paint create a dynamic and collective representation of the community’s memories and tell a visual story of the South Tacoma neighborhood’s past, present and future.

Photographer Dane Gregory Meyer captured the event through the following photo essay.

Community members gathered at the STAR Center for the artwork dedication.

Community members gathered at the STAR Center for the artwork dedication.

During the dedication: Claudia Riedener, artist;  Chelsea Levy, Sound Transit; Marilyn Strickland, Mayor of the City of Tacoma; and Joe Lonergan, Tacoma City Council member.

During the dedication (left to right): Claudia Riedener, artist; Chelsea Levy, Sound Transit; Marilyn Strickland, Mayor of the City of Tacoma; and Joe Lonergan, Tacoma City Council member.

Mayor Strickland reads a poem, Manitou Trestle, written by Ken Sikes in commemoration of the dedication of the trestle.

Mayor Strickland read a poem, Manitou Trestle, written by Ken Sikes in commemoration of the artwork dedication. “…we poor, tired, huddled masses, yearning to be seen, passing through, and to. So loved. So love. So Tacoma.”

Barb Luecke, Sound Transit Art Program Manager, presents the Golden Roller community stewardship award to Venus Dergan.

Barb Luecke, Sound Transit Art Program Manager (left), presented the Golden Roller community stewardship award to Venus Dergan (right).

Artists Chris Jordan, Kenji Stoll, and Claudia Riedener (left to right) talk about the inspiration for the mural.

Artists Chris Jordan, Kenji Stoll, and Claudia Riedener (left to right) talked about the inspiration for the mural.

 

Left to right: City Council member Joe Lonergan, artist Chris Jordan, Mayor Marilyn Strickland, artist Claudia Riedener, and artist Kenji Stoll.

Left to right: City Council member Joe Lonergan, artist Chris Jordan, Mayor Marilyn Strickland, artist Claudia Riedener, and artist Kenji Stoll.

An enthusiastic group of attendees visit the mural site after the dedication ceremony.

An enthusiastic group of attendees visit the mural site after the dedication ceremony.

Echo Curry and children from the Henry T. Schatz branch of the Boys and Girls Club inspect the mural they helped influence.

Echo Curry and children from the Henry T. Schatz branch of the Boys and Girls Club inspect the mural they helped influence.

The mural is composed of botanically-inspired ceramic tiles, stamped with quotes collected from the community, layered with historic buildings and topography of the land as illustrated through aerosol paint.

The mural is composed of botanically-inspired ceramic tiles, stamped with quotes collected from the community, layered with historic buildings and topography of the land as illustrated through aerosol paint.

A view of the expansive mural, which covers the north and south sides as well as the median of the train trestle.

A view of the expansive mural, which covers the north and south sides as well as the median of the train trestle.

Manitou Trestle Dedication

Manitou Trestle Dedication

All photos used with permission from Dane Gregory Meyer. Copyright Dane Gregory Meyer.

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Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyDane Gregory Meyer has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009, currently as Vice Chair, in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

Ruston-Pt. Defiance celebrates art and community

15 Dec
Back row: John Truman (RPDBD President 2014-15), Karen Truman (Treasurer of Tacoma Neighborhoods Together), Tammi Herridge (property owner & proprietor of Antique Sandwich Co.) From row: Beth Torbet (RPDBD Past President 2010-14), Lily Weddermann , Jennifer Weddermann (artist), Juel Lugo (LILT, Project Manager)

Back row: John Trueman (RPDBD President 2014-15), Karen Trueman (Treasurer of Tacoma Neighborhoods Together), Tamie Herridge (property owner & proprietor of Antique Sandwich Co.) From row: Beth Torbet (RPDBD Past President 2010-14), Lily Weddermann , Jennifer Weddermann (artist), Juel Lugo (LILT, Project Manager)

Art plays such a powerful role in the vitality of a community. It was illustrated again last Saturday morning as the Ruston-Pt. Defiance Business District dedicated their new art installation, a series of four sculptural benches, funded in part by the Tacoma Arts Commission. Gathered were members of the Ruston-Pt. Defiance Business community and artist Jennifer Weddermann, joyfully celebrating the latest colorful addition of public art – sculpture in the form of benches.

You'll find one of the four benches outside of the Antique Sandwich Co. at N. 51st and Pearl.

You’ll find one of the four benches outside of the Antique Sandwich Co. at N. 51st and Pearl.

The benches, hand-crafted by local artist Jennifer Weddermann, are made of steel and have aquatic and octopus imagery along with gears and mechanical elements that represent the district’s strong manufacturing history. Two of the sculptural benches have additional functional elements – one has a bike rack while the other hinges to allow users to sit facing two directions.

This wasn’t the first time the arts have helped the ‘North Pearl Business District.’ Unsolicited appreciations were shared about other funded art projects and programs in the district. A large mural on the wall of the Antique Sandwich Company was one. The impact of Spaceworks was another.

“This district has had a 50% occupancy rate. Spaceworks is great, bringing in more interest, adding vitality and potential new tenants,” said community activist John Truman.

This is great grass roots economic development in our neighborhoods, affecting small businesses and supporting local artists.

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to have supported the bench project through Arts Projects funding.

All photos used with permission from Dane Gregory Meyer. Copyright Dane Gregory Meyer.

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Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyDane Gregory Meyer has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009 in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

Sun King Reigns Again

30 Jun

On June 25, About 40 community members from Tacoma and beyond gathered at the pocket park at S. 15th and Dock Street to welcome the return of Thomas Morandi’s Sun King sculpture to the public realm. Photographer Dane Gregory Meyer captured the event through the following photo essay.

The monumental-scale public art sculpture, part of the City of Tacoma’s Municipal Art Collection, was originally installed in 1977 in front of what is now the Hotel Murano. The piece was moved into storage in 2007 while it underwent repairs and awaited its new permanent location. 

Mascots from Museum of Glass, Tacoma Art Museum, and Tacoma Art Museum came out to celebrate the Sun King.

Mascots from Museum of Glass, Washington State History Museum, and Tacoma Art Museum came out to celebrate the Sun King.

Council Member David Boe and Tacoma Arts Commission members Scott Ramsey, Traci Kelly, and Don Lacky gather before the dedication.

Council Member David Boe and Tacoma Arts Commission members Scott Ramsey, Traci Kelly, and Don Lacky gathered before the dedication.

A group of about 40 community members gathered in celebration of the artist, Thomas Morandi, and his artwork, Sun King.

Community members gathered in celebration of the artist, Thomas Morandi, and his artwork, Sun King.

The monumental-scale Sun King provides the focal point for those gathered in celebration.

The monumental-scale Sun King provided the focal point and backdrop for those who came out to celebrate.

Council Member David Boe chanted The Beattles' Sun King lyrics.

Council Member David Boe led the crowd while chanting the lyrics to Sun King by The Beattles.

Artist Thomas Morandi helps dedicate his artwork.

Artist Thomas Morandi spoke about the changes in Tacoma from the time he created the artwork in 1977 to today.

Artist Thomas Morandi and former arts administrator Ellida Lathrop pose in front of the artwork they brought to Tacoma in 1977.

Artist Thomas Morandi and former arts administrator Ellida Lathrop posed in front of the artwork they brought to Tacoma in 1977.

All photos used with permission from Dane Gregory Meyer. Copyright Dane Gregory Meyer.

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Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyDane Gregory Meyer has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009 in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

A Farewell to Felder

23 May

On May 10, Tacoma bid a fond farewell to Maestro Harvey Felder as he wrapped up his 20-year tenure as music director of the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra. Photographer Dane Gregory Meyer captured Maestro Felder’s final concert in Tacoma through the following photo essay.

Marquee billing Tacoma Symphony Bids Fond Farewell to their Maestro of 20 years, Harvey Felder.

Marquee billing Tacoma Symphony Bids Fond Farewell to their Maestro of 20 years, Harvey Felder.

 

Patrons, including Mayor Marilyn Strickland, gather to enter the Pantages Theater.

Patrons, including Mayor Marilyn Strickland, gather to enter the Pantages Theater.

 

TSO Felder Farewell

Mayor Marilyn Strickland reads the Proclamation naming May 6-12, 2014 as Harvey Felder Week.

Maestro Felder quietly centers before taking stage, awaiting his final conducting of the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra.

Maestro Felder quietly centers before taking stage, waiting his final conducting of the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra.

Maestro Harvey Felder addresses the audience.

Maestro Felder addresses the audience.

Tacoma Symphony Orchestra performs Mahler, Symphony #5.

Tacoma Symphony Orchestra performs Mahler, Symphony #5.

Completion of performance and first of several standing ovations.

Completion of performance and first of several standing ovations.

Harvey Felder gives thanks to his orchestra.

Maestro Felder gives thanks to his orchestra.

Maestro Felder exits with flowers during standing ovation.

Maestro Felder exits with flowers during standing ovation.

Encore performance, leading the orchestra and audience playing and singing ‘Auld Lang Syne’.

Encore performance, leading the orchestra and audience playing and singing ‘Auld Lang Syne’.

A farewell kiss.

A farewell kiss.

Final standing ovation and exiting stage by Maestro Felder and Concert Master Svend Ronning.

Final standing ovation and exiting stage by Maestro Felder and Concert Master Svend Ronning.

All photos used with permission from Dane Gregory Meyer. Copyright Dane Gregory Meyer. The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra through the Arts Anchor Fund.

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Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyDane Gregory Meyer has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009 in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

Where cinema and community meet

13 May
The Grand Cinema's 72 Hour Film Competition viewing party. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

The Grand Cinema’s 72 Hour Film Competition viewing party. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

What a fabulous city we live in!

I’ve realized this all along, except when it’s been raining for a month and a half. We live in a city with The Grand Cinema, a non-profit organization which fosters such community sharing as the ’72 Hour Film Competition’.

Last Friday night was the annual viewing party, a public event which gathered 26 film makers, their films, and an audience in excess of 400, to revel and celebrate at Urban Grace.

Each film making participant had to write, shoot, score and edit their short film in just 72 hours. And, they were required to include four specific elements including a count down, duct tape, and a particular line and product placement. The end results were 26 completely unique views into the psyche of our community.

What impressed me most was how non-stodgy it was, how non-big-city.  There were the impressive high-quality films with cinematography skill, lighting, and obvious acting experience but there were also the quirky home spun films. All were welcomed and strongly applauded. The Grand Cinema provided an inclusive environment for film makers to showcase their creativity and our community stepped up with enthusiasm.

I would strongly suggest noting your calendar for next year’s ‘72 Hour Film Competition’ and keeping your attention on what The Grand Cinema has coming up.

COMING UP

What: An Evening of Cinematic Music
Join The Grand Cinema and Tacoma Symphony Orchestra for a celebration of music and cinema. Narrated by NWPR’s Steve Reeder, the concert will feature the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra’s string nonet as well as local singer-songwriters performing iconic songs and scores from throughout film history.
Where: Urban Grace, 902 Market Street
When: Friday, June 20, 7:30 pm (doors open at 6:30 pm)
Cost: $30
More information: www.grandcinema.com, (253) 572-6062

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support both The Grand Cinema and Tacoma Symphony Orchestra through the Arts Anchor Fund.

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Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyThis review was written by Tacoma Arts Commission member Dane Meyer. Dane has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009 in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

Immerse yourself in history

5 May
Crafts of the Past will take you back to the 19th century through the handiwork of local artisans. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

Crafts of the Past will take you back to the 19th century through the handiwork of local artisans. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

Fort Nisqually is offering a fascinating season-long series called ‘Crafts from the Past’.  Each weekend until the end of September the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum presents artisans from diverse skill sets who will show you how pioneers made things.  The setting puts you back in time and the period costumes of artisans further sets the feeling that you have stepped back into days long past.

Fort Nisqually invites visitors to step back in time. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

Fort Nisqually invites visitors to step back in time. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

The minute I stepped out of my car at Ft. Nisqually, on the bluff above the Narrows Passage, there were eagles chattering in their hollow shrill stutter. A raven bellowed in a deep clatter nearby. Inside the fort was a world only imagined from seeing movies or reading stories. There, artisans were demonstrating handiwork from the 1800s such as iron forging. But my purpose was to see the current week’s Crafts of the Past presentation, a combination of gun smithing and silver inlay with artist Steve Baima.

Artisans provide samples of hand-crafted work to help illustrate their process. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

Artisans provide samples of hand-crafted work to help illustrate their process. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

A very enthusiastic Baima, dressed in hand-made period clothing, explained how settlers, during the agrarian culture of the 1700s, would spend their winters creating such things as rifles, to be sold later.  As competition grew so did the artistry of the pieces. Examples were ready on hand to show interested participants.

COMING UP

Crafts of the Past is just getting started. Some of the other talents to be presented this year include: “sheep to shawl”, basket weaving, illustrating, beadwork, broom making, wood-turning, cheese making, banjo making, textile arts, bookbinding, and much more.

What: Crafts of the Past – hands-on presentations by artisan demonstrating crafts of the past
Where: Ft. Nisqually, in Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St.
When: Every weekend until the end of September
Cost: Included with admission (adults $5, youth 4-18 $4)
More information: www.fortnisquallyfoundation.org, (253)591-5339

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support this event through Arts Projects funding.

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Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyThis review was written by Tacoma Arts Commission member Dane Meyer. Dane has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009 in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

At the Intersection of Film and Culture

21 Mar

SisterCities

Before the light and airy University of Puget Sound venue saw sunset and darkness slowly settled, nearly 90 people gathered on Thursday to become acquainted with Norwegian words, win prizes, and bid on small auction items as part of the Sister City International Film Festival’s screening of the Norwegian film The Other Side of Sunday.

A jovial mature audience was cautioned to hang in there, past the film’s first 10 minute racey beginning.  Most of us in the audience had lived through the 60’s and needed no warning against any blush that may have come.

The venue, Commencement Hall, grew dark in a beautiful way, as a rare sunny afternoon outside turned to evening, then night. The film absorbed attention and was vivid in its portrayal of rural Norwegian life in a secular household of the 1950’s. 

This story was billed as a coming of age story about a Protestant minister’s daughter, but at its core there seemed a broader coming of age, women gathering courage, one generation after another, to find their own truth, freedoms and life apart from traditions of male dominance disguised as piety.  It was called a dark comedy, though that may be more in the Shakespearean sense, happy ending rather than laughs.

I thought this film was a treat and well worth seeing. I imagine there will be discussions among members of the audience in the days that come.

COMING UP

March 27: Featuring the sister city of Morocco with a screening of Defining Love, A Failed Attempt

Acting overlaps reality, bridging roles with those in one’s life. Hamza and Zineb travel to a remote area in the Atlas mountains in Morocco to research for parts they’re supposed to play in an upcoming rendition of the legend of Isli and Tisselt – a tale of two lovers whose tears are believed to have created the two lakes that bear their name. Zineb and Hamza, both emerging from failed relationships, meet Mohammad, a young shepherd, who is a dreamer. DEFINING LOVE is a meditative exploration of the invisible in our lives, with nature as its witness.

April 3: Featuring the sister city of Cuba with a screening of Esther, Somewhere

A year after the death of his wife Maruja, Lino Catala, a staid old man is approached by Larry Po, another quirky old man with multiple personalities. Larry confesses Lino that his late wife, Maruja, led a double life: by day an ordinary housewife, and by night an impressive bolero singer. From this moment on, the two elders join in a thorough search of Maruja´s past while trying to find the whereabouts of Esther Rodenas, the great love of Larry’s life. While following the trail of the women he loved, a friendship develops between the two that definitively transforms and shows them that life does not end in old age.

Where: University of Puget Sound, Commencement Hall, Tahoma Room (corner of N. 13th and Lawrence Street)
Time: Doors open at 6 pm, cultural program starts at 6:15 pm, film starts at 7 pm
Cost: FREE! Seats are limited to first come, first serve

More information about the 12th Annual Sister Cities International Film Festival is available at sistercityfilmfest.org.

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support this event through Arts Projects funding.

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Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyThis review was written by Tacoma Arts Commission member Dane Meyer. Dane has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009 in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

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