Tag Archives: Arts Anchor Fund

2017-18 Arts Anchor Fund and TAIP Recipients Announced

22 Mar

Hilltop Artists Team Production student, Dawntae, marvering hot glass. Photo courtesy of Hilltop Artists

10 Arts Organizations and 18 Artists Funded by Tacoma Arts Commission

The Tacoma Arts Commission has awarded $255,000 to 10 Tacoma-based arts organizations through its Arts Anchor Fund program, and $45,000 to 18 Tacoma artists through its Tacoma Artists Initiative Program. The Arts Anchor Fund program awards range in value from $20,000 to $33,000 each, and the Tacoma Artists Initiative Program awards are $2,500 each. Funding for both programs is for the 2017-2018 biennium.

“Tacoma’s arts community is thriving,” said Tacoma Arts Commission Chair Mike Sweney. “With these grants, we are honored to support our major arts institutions and independent artists in engaging, enlightening, and inspiring their communities as well as audiences from the Puget Sound and beyond.”

Arts Anchor Fund Program Awards

From Tacoma Opera’s production of The Magic Flute. Photo courtesy of Tacoma Opera.

The 2017-2018 Arts Anchor Fund program award recipients are: The Grand Cinema, Hilltop Artists, Museum of Glass, Northwest Sinfonietta, Symphony Tacoma, Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma Little Theatre, Tacoma Musical Playhouse, Tacoma Opera, and Tacoma Youth Symphony Association.

In 2016, nine of these organizations served 506,909 people, provided free admission to 130,181 people, and generated an estimated $9.67 million for the local economy.

The Tacoma Arts Commission established the Arts Anchor Fund program in 1995 to provide financial support to major local not-for-profit arts organizations that significantly improve the quality of life for Tacoma. These arts organizations serve Tacoma’s community through regularly scheduled performances, exhibits and events, and school and outreach programs.

Tacoma Artists Initiative Program Awards

The Red Chador: Threshold
public performance-installation by Anida Yoeu Ali. Photo courtesy of Anida Yoeu Ali.

The 2017-2018 Tacoma Artists Initiative Program funded artists are: Anida Yoeu Ali, Travis Barker, Priscilla Dobler, Daniel Garcia, Antonio Gomez, Mark Hoppmann, Maria Jost, Anne Lyman, Kevin Miller, Elise Richman, Mauricio Robalino, Jessica Spring, Nicholas Stokes, Kenji Stoll, Masahiro Sugano, Qin Tan, Collin Veenstra, and Ben Wildenhaus

Funded Tacoma Artists Initiative Program projects include: production and screening of a live action short film; production of two music albums paired with public performances and a workshop; writing a book-length poetry manuscript with an accompanying reading; writing and staged reading of a one-act play; music performances on a portable stage; an exploration of the intersection of music and culture, including a bilingual workshop; a multi-media performance of early music; three multimedia temporary public art installations; and the creation and exhibition of visual art including a series of handmade books, illustrations, paintings, mixed-media pieces, letterpress art, and poster art.

From DUELS, by Nick Stokes, directed by José Amador. Pictured: Daniel Christensen and Carter Rodriquez. Photo by Andrea Sassenrath.

The Tacoma Artists Initiative Program was established in 1999 to assist artists with the generation of new work, and to share their talent with the public in a free and accessible format.

The Arts Anchor Fund program and Tacoma Artists Initiative Program are two of three funding programs administered by the Tacoma Arts Commission. For a complete listing of funding programs and information about the Tacoma Arts Commission, visit cityoftacoma.org/arts.

Chihuly Drawings, beautifully presented, well worth seeing

5 May
From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

I recently visited the Museum of Glass to take in the Chihuly Drawings exhibition.  The beautifully curated show impressed me beyond expectation. I have some familiarity with Dale Chihuly’s drawings, due to past experience photographing some of them for the American Heart Association, who he has donated to. I know the nuances of his painting, from trying to capture their vibrance and reflectivity at the same time. But to see the collections now on exhibition at the Museum of Glass is breathtaking. I especially enjoyed the collection of pieces near the back gallery.

Chihuly Drawings continues through June 30, 2015. I suggest you plan to take some time exploring this exhibit, it’s worth pondering. And, while you are there, if you haven’t seen the Patra Passage exhibition, that should be on your list as well. You will be more than happy you did.

 

From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

From the Chihuly Drawings exhibition at the Museum of Glass. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

COMING UP

What: Chihuly’s Venetians: The George R. Stroemple Collection
Where: Museum of Glass, 1801 Dock Street
When: July 19, 2015 – January 4, 2016
More information: www.museumofglass.org, (866) 468-7386

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support the Museum of Glass through the Arts Anchor Fund.

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Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyThis review was written by Tacoma Arts Commission Vice Chair Dane Meyer. Dane has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009 in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

2015-16 Arts Anchor Fund and TAIP Recipients Announced

18 Mar

Nine Arts Organizations and 16 Artists Funded by Tacoma Arts Commission

RJ Oki and Trent Quoicho blowing at the Museum of Glass as part of a collaboration with Team Chihuly.

RJ Oki and Trent Quoicho blowing at the Museum of Glass as part of a collaboration with Team Chihuly. Photo provided by Hilltop Artists.

The Tacoma Arts Commission has awarded $255,000 to nine Tacoma-based arts organizations through its Arts Anchor Fund program, and $40,000 to 16 Tacoma artists through its Tacoma Artists Initiative Program. The Arts Anchor Fund program awards range in value from $20,000 to $40,000 each, and the Tacoma Artists Initiative Program awards are $2,500 each. Funding for both programs is for the 2015-16 biennium.

“Supporting a diverse group of local artists and arts organizations helps build a creative community,” said Tacoma Arts Commission Chair Traci Kelly. “Funding the arts at multiple levels means our city gives everyone opportunities for meaningful engagement and expression.”

Arts Anchor Fund Program Awards

Students from Tacoma Art Museum's after school off-site outreach programs visit the museum to tour the galleries. Photo provided by Tacoma Art Museum.

Students from Tacoma Art Museum’s after school off-site outreach programs visit the museum to tour the galleries. Photo provided by Tacoma Art Museum.

The 2015-2016 Arts Anchor Fund program award recipients are: Hilltop Artists, Museum of Glass, Northwest Sinfonietta, Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma Musical Playhouse, Tacoma Opera, Tacoma Symphony Orchestra, Tacoma Youth Symphony Association and The Grand Cinema.

In 2014, these nine organizations served 500,654 people, provided free admission to 124,209 people, and generated an estimated $9.55 million for the local economy.

Flame-working demonstration as part of Museum of Glass' Hot Shop Heroes: Healing with Fire program. Photo by Greg Owen.

Flame-working demonstration as part of Museum of Glass’ Hot Shop Heroes: Healing with Fire program. Photo by Greg Owen.

The Tacoma Arts Commission established the Arts Anchor Fund program in 1995 to provide financial support to major local not-for-profit arts organizations that significantly improve the quality of life for Tacoma. These arts organizations serve Tacoma’s community through regularly scheduled performances, exhibits and events, and school and outreach programs.

Tacoma Artists Initiative Program Awards

Acrylic painting by Christopher Jordan for COLORED Series. Photo provided by Christopher Jordan.

Author, Acrylic painting by Christopher Jordan for COLORED Series. Photo provided by Christopher Jordan.

The 2015-2016 Tacoma Artists Initiative Program funded artists are: Saign Charlestein, Jennifer Chushcoff, Matthew Coté, Kristin Giordano, Michael Haeflinger, Whitney Henry-Lester, Christopher Jordan, Jeremy Mangan, Janet Marcavage, Tim Norris, Chandler O’Leary, Isaac Olsen, Nichole Rathburn, Holly Senn, Emilie Shimkus and Gregory Youtz.

Catabomb, textile sculpture by Nichole Rathburn. Photo provided by Nichole Rathburn.

Catabomb, textile sculpture by Nichole Rathburn. Photo provided by Nichole Rathburn.

Funded Tacoma Artists Initiative Program projects include a spoken word album and poetry reading; a podcast series exploring varying perspectives on Tacoma; production of a series of short films showcasing poetry; performance and recording of instrumental and vocal songs; production of a book of poetry and photographs; and the creation and exhibition of two- and three-dimensional visual art including metal art, photography, mixed media, paintings, printmaking, illustrations, and textile and paper sculptures.

The Tacoma Artists Initiative Program was established in 1999 to assist artists with the generation of new work, and to share their talent with the public in a free and accessible format.

Fall Haul, sketchbook drawing by Chandler O'Leary. Photo provided by Chandler O'Leary.

Fall Haul, sketchbook drawing by Chandler O’Leary. Photo provided by Chandler O’Leary.

The Arts Anchor Fund program and Tacoma Artists Initiative Program are two of three funding programs administered by the Tacoma Arts Commission. For a complete listing of funding programs and information about the Tacoma Arts Commission, visit cityoftacoma.org/arts.

Tacoma Young Artists Orchestra Spotlights Talented Young Musicians

25 Feb
Patrons gather after the concert to congratulate student soloist Anna Harris.

Patrons gather after the concert to congratulate Tacoma Young Artists Orchestra student soloist Anna Harris.

On February 21st, I had the pleasure of attending the Tacoma Young Artists Orchestra under the baton of Conductor Dale Johnson.  These exceptionally talented young musicians performed a very exciting concert.

Tacoma Young Artists Orchestra is one of six orchestras presented by the Tacoma Youth Symphony Association — making it one of the top youth orchestra associations in the country.  Because of their size, and more importantly, their dedication to excellence, TYSA provides young musicians the opportunity to play as part of a large orchestra starting at a young age.  The Tacoma Young Artists Orchestra is the penultimate orchestra in TYSA, with musicians ranging in age from late middle school to early high school.

Tacoma Young Artists Orchestra student soloist, Claire Turner.

Tacoma Young Artists Orchestra student soloist, Claire Turner.

The program I attended featured late 19th and early 20th century composers evoking a “Celebration of the New World.” The highlights of the evening were two pieces for solo violin and orchestra.  The first, Zigeunerweisen (Gypsy Airs), Op. 20 by Pablo de Sarasate, featured an electrifying solo performance by high school junior Anna Harris.  In the second, soloist Claire Turner, also a junior in high school, skillfully played a delightful finale to Max Bruch’s Concerto No. 1 in g minor, Op. 26.  These gifted soloists were backed by approximately 75 of their peers with a full orchestra.  The music was breathtaking.

During intermission a patron remarked to me, “You can’t listen to this music and not have hope for the future.”

Tacoma is very fortunate to have the Tacoma Youth Symphony Association – an organization that inspires excellence and provides unique, high caliber opportunities for young musicians in our community. TYSA truly is a community treasure.

COMING UP

What: “Rhapsody in Blue” by Tacoma Youth Symphony (TYSA’s most senior level orchestra)
Where: Rialto Theater, 310 S. 9th Street
When: Sunday, March 13:00 pm
Cost: Main floor tickets are $8.00 before the concert and $10.00 at the door.  There are 100 free student festival tickets available at the door. Balcony tickets are $16 – $19.
More information: www.tysamusic.org, (253) 627-2792

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support the Tacoma Youth Symphony Association through the Arts Anchor Fund.

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This review was written by Tacoma Arts Commission member Scott Campbell. Scott is the Managing Director of Tacoma Youth Theatre. He is the winner of two Emmy Awards and has worked as a writer; television producer; media consultant; communications director, and theater director, actor, and designer. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2014.

Celebrating a new artistic era for the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra

22 Oct
Sarah Ioannides will take the stage on Saturday for her inaugural concert as Music Director for the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra. Photo by Mark Olencki.

Sarah Ioannides will take the stage on Saturday for her inaugural concert as Music Director for the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra. Photo by Mark Olencki.

This Saturday will mark the official start of a new artistic era for the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra (TSO). Sarah Ioannides, TSO’s new Artistic Director, will take the stage to conduct her inaugural concert featuring percussion superstar Dame Evelyn Glennie. The concert will feature the world premiere of Portraits of Immortal Love, a new percussion concerto written expressly for Ms. Glennie by composer Sean O’Boyle. A concerto is a full-length musical work that showcases an instrument or set of instruments, accompanied by orchestra. Portraits is written in commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of World War I. Also on the program will be Ravel’s Bolero, Debussy’s Nocturnes, and Respighi’s Pines of Rome. Bolero is famous for its repeating, lyrical melodic line and ostinato snare drum beat, which gradually builds in volume to a crashing conclusion. The Debussy and Respighi are big, colorful works as well, which together with the Ravel and O’Boyle will make for a spectacular, exciting evening of music.

World-renown percussionist Dame Evelyn Glennie. Photo by James Wilson.

World-renown percussionist Dame Evelyn Glennie. Photo by James Wilson.

Dame Evelyn Glennie, who is profoundly deaf, is the first person in musical history to successfully create and sustain a full-time career as a solo percussionist. As one of the most eclectic and innovative musicians on the scene today she creates performances of such vitality that they almost constitute a new genre. Awarded Dame Commander of the British Empire in 2007, the double Grammy award winning artist gives more than 100 concerts a year worldwide. Her diversity of collaborations includes visual mixing of live music with the likes of DJ Yoda and the ‘Beat Boxer’ Shlomo. Other collaborations include Nana Vasconcelos, Kodo, Bela Fleck, Björk, Bobby McFerrin, Sting, The Kings Singers, and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. In July 2012 Glennie was featured in the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Olympics in London. Born in Scotland, Glennie is based in the countryside of Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom.

This will mark a fitting opening to the era of Sarah Ioannides, who mounts the TSO podium as the TSO’s first new music director in two decades, on the heels of the historic tenure of Harvey Felder. Hailed by The New York Times as a conductor with “unquestionable strength and authority,” Sarah Ioannides is a passionate advocate of classical music through innovative projects, community engagement, education, and championing new works. The British conductor is a versatile musician, whose past studies include violin, viola, piano, and French horn, as well as singing, recorder, saxophone, and guitar. Ioannides served as Assistant conductor and Production Coordinator to Tan Dun, composer of the music for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, for many multimedia performances worldwide.

The TSO has been a vital part of Tacoma’s cultural landscape since 1946, and has operated as a professional symphony orchestra for the past 19 years. With 80 contracted musicians and an affiliated community chorus, the TSO brings music into the lives of 20,000 citizens annually throughout the South Puget Sound.

This concert, one of the premier events of Tacoma Arts Month 2014, is sponsored by Gordon Thomas Honeywell and the City of Tacoma Anchor Fund. Ms. Glennie’s appearance is underwritten by the Tacoma Philharmonic Endowment Fund and the Gottfried and Mary Fuchs Foundation.

Tickets for this concert are sold out but this is just the start of the 2014-15 season and there are 7 other concerts lined up. Find out more about the TSO’s season and purchase tickets for upcoming concerts by visiting www.tacomasymphony.org or calling 253-591-5894 or toll free at 800-291-7593.

A Farewell to Felder

23 May

On May 10, Tacoma bid a fond farewell to Maestro Harvey Felder as he wrapped up his 20-year tenure as music director of the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra. Photographer Dane Gregory Meyer captured Maestro Felder’s final concert in Tacoma through the following photo essay.

Marquee billing Tacoma Symphony Bids Fond Farewell to their Maestro of 20 years, Harvey Felder.

Marquee billing Tacoma Symphony Bids Fond Farewell to their Maestro of 20 years, Harvey Felder.

 

Patrons, including Mayor Marilyn Strickland, gather to enter the Pantages Theater.

Patrons, including Mayor Marilyn Strickland, gather to enter the Pantages Theater.

 

TSO Felder Farewell

Mayor Marilyn Strickland reads the Proclamation naming May 6-12, 2014 as Harvey Felder Week.

Maestro Felder quietly centers before taking stage, awaiting his final conducting of the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra.

Maestro Felder quietly centers before taking stage, waiting his final conducting of the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra.

Maestro Harvey Felder addresses the audience.

Maestro Felder addresses the audience.

Tacoma Symphony Orchestra performs Mahler, Symphony #5.

Tacoma Symphony Orchestra performs Mahler, Symphony #5.

Completion of performance and first of several standing ovations.

Completion of performance and first of several standing ovations.

Harvey Felder gives thanks to his orchestra.

Maestro Felder gives thanks to his orchestra.

Maestro Felder exits with flowers during standing ovation.

Maestro Felder exits with flowers during standing ovation.

Encore performance, leading the orchestra and audience playing and singing ‘Auld Lang Syne’.

Encore performance, leading the orchestra and audience playing and singing ‘Auld Lang Syne’.

A farewell kiss.

A farewell kiss.

Final standing ovation and exiting stage by Maestro Felder and Concert Master Svend Ronning.

Final standing ovation and exiting stage by Maestro Felder and Concert Master Svend Ronning.

All photos used with permission from Dane Gregory Meyer. Copyright Dane Gregory Meyer. The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra through the Arts Anchor Fund.

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Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyDane Gregory Meyer has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009 in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

Glass for good

14 May
Artists hard at work in the Hilltop Artists hot shop at Jason Lee Middle School. Photo by Scott Ramsey.

Artists hard at work in the Hilltop Artists hot shop at Jason Lee Middle School. Photo by Scott Ramsey.

You know an event that encourages arriving an hour early to secure a ticket to be one of the first to get in may have a hard time living up to the hype. Fortunately, anyone who has been to Hilltop Artists’ Spring Glass Sale before knows this is one event where it’s good to be first in line.

Believing the hype, I joined several dozen other people in line early on May 10 to secure my ticket for the 10am opening. This approach to staged entry times allows organizers to control the number of folks in the sales room at any given time. The result is a heightened sense of exclusivity for being there early, but also a manageable number of people in a room full of expensive breakable things at any given time.

Held annually at Jason Lee Middle School, home of the Hilltop Artists hot shop, the Spring Sale provides glass art lovers a chance to purchase a variety of work produced by the student artists involved in this thriving program. The quality and creativity of the pieces is very high and patrons compete to purchase their favorites from several hundred on display, before they are snatched up by someone else with a faster hand or quicker eye.

Work ranges from handmade glass marbles and beads selling for a few dollars each, to larger, elaborate vases, vessels, plates, and decorative items priced in the hundreds of dollars. Pieces were grouped on tables based on their color, with bright splashes of every shade imaginable to be found. I quickly laid claim to several beautiful pieces including hand-blown apple-green, and tangerine-orange vases and a quirky little rose-red bird figurine, all of which made perfect Mother’s Day gifts this year.

Funds generated at the Glass Sale go to support the Hilltop Artists non-profit glass arts program which was established with the help of Dale Chihuly in 1994. Through the program, over 500 students, ages 12-20 are provided with hot shop classes and individual instruction each year. Hilltop Artists serves a diverse group of youth throughout Pierce County, and is especially effective with young people who are searching for ways to connect and belong. There is also support for those who find themselves struggling academically, socially and/or behaviorally.

 

BE A PART OF THE ACTION NOW

Help Hilltop Artists fund new hot shop equipment

Creating glass art requires lots of expensive equipment, like furnaces and glory holes. Right now, Hilltop Artists’ largest glory hole, a critical piece of equipment to glass blowing, is just squeaking by and will need to be replaced sooner than expected. A new glory hole will be safer for students, more energy-efficient, and allow teaching staff to focus all of their time on the students, rather than spending hours fixing broken equipment.

The campaign has a goal of raising $30,000 to cover the equipment, installation and maintenance. They have currently raised $20,015. Consider donating to the campaign and you can choose from a number of perks including magnets, t-shirts, glass floats, earrings, and glass bowls and vases.

More information: Find out more and contribute any amount here.

 

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support Hilltop Artists through the Arts Anchor Fund.

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Tacoma Arts Commission member Scott Ramsey. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.This review was written by Scott Ramsey, a Tacoma Arts Commission member since 2011. A fourth generation Tacoman, Scott lives and works locally and has been diligently defending the Arts for decades. His dry sense of humor is often misconstrued as bitterness and sarcasm, but he insists he’s “just kidding”.

Where cinema and community meet

13 May
The Grand Cinema's 72 Hour Film Competition viewing party. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

The Grand Cinema’s 72 Hour Film Competition viewing party. Photo by Dane Gregory Meyer.

What a fabulous city we live in!

I’ve realized this all along, except when it’s been raining for a month and a half. We live in a city with The Grand Cinema, a non-profit organization which fosters such community sharing as the ’72 Hour Film Competition’.

Last Friday night was the annual viewing party, a public event which gathered 26 film makers, their films, and an audience in excess of 400, to revel and celebrate at Urban Grace.

Each film making participant had to write, shoot, score and edit their short film in just 72 hours. And, they were required to include four specific elements including a count down, duct tape, and a particular line and product placement. The end results were 26 completely unique views into the psyche of our community.

What impressed me most was how non-stodgy it was, how non-big-city.  There were the impressive high-quality films with cinematography skill, lighting, and obvious acting experience but there were also the quirky home spun films. All were welcomed and strongly applauded. The Grand Cinema provided an inclusive environment for film makers to showcase their creativity and our community stepped up with enthusiasm.

I would strongly suggest noting your calendar for next year’s ‘72 Hour Film Competition’ and keeping your attention on what The Grand Cinema has coming up.

COMING UP

What: An Evening of Cinematic Music
Join The Grand Cinema and Tacoma Symphony Orchestra for a celebration of music and cinema. Narrated by NWPR’s Steve Reeder, the concert will feature the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra’s string nonet as well as local singer-songwriters performing iconic songs and scores from throughout film history.
Where: Urban Grace, 902 Market Street
When: Friday, June 20, 7:30 pm (doors open at 6:30 pm)
Cost: $30
More information: www.grandcinema.com, (253) 572-6062

The Tacoma Arts Commission is proud to support both The Grand Cinema and Tacoma Symphony Orchestra through the Arts Anchor Fund.

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Dane Gregory Meyer PhotographyThis review was written by Tacoma Arts Commission member Dane Meyer. Dane has been a professional photographer for over 25 years and owns Dane Gregory Meyer Photography. He has served on the Tacoma Arts Commission since 2009 in a desire to give back to the community and support the arts as an economic engine and core for Tacoma.

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